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“SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

+mood - Sun, 12/29/2013 - 07:36
JM4 640x467 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

JM1 640x427 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

JM2 640x860 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

JM5 640x881 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

JM10 640x427 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

JM11 640x958 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

JM 4590 640x634 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

JM 6319 640x739 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

Julio de Mucha Layout 640x828 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

Julio de Mucha M 640x828 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO

courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO

Julio de Mucha is a Mexican brand that has been producing top-quality, handcrafted shoes for the last 23 years. However, up until recently, they didn’t have a store of their own. By the end of 2012, the first “Shoeroom” opened to the public in the hip neighborhood of La Condesa, Mexico City.

Woven threads and maple wood sheets give the store its unique personality. The threads symbolize the process that defines the essence of every pair of shoes: the fact that they are handwoven, a craft that nowadays is carried out in just a few places of the world. These two dominant elements (wood and threads) were used to build the seats and the shoe shelves, both featuring the brand’s logo.

+ Project facts

DESIGN: ESRAWE STUDIO
COLLABORATORS: ANNA SALCEDO, DANIEL LUNDVQUIST
GRAPHIC IDENTITY: MARIANA GIBERT
CONCEPT: HÉCTOR ESRAWE
PHOTOGRAPHER: JAIME NAVARRO
YEAR: Nov 2012

+ All images and drawings courtesy ESRAWE STUDIO JM1 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM2 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM3 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM4 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM5 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM6 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM7 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM8 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM9 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM10 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM11 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM12 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM13 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM 4578 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM 4590 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM 6319 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM 6323 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM 6333 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO JM 6334 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO Julio de Mucha Layout 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO Julio de Mucha M 180x180 “SHOEROOM” of JULIO DE MUCHA \ ESRAWE STUDIO
Categories: Design Feeds

The 7 Most Deplorable Fashion Stories of the Year (Vote for the Most Outrageous!)

Inhabitat - Sun, 12/29/2013 - 07:24

wtf, fashion stories, 2013, inhabitat, ecouterre, vote

While the trend towards sustainable fashion is gathering steam, there still remains a gigantic industry that encourages some incredibly devastating practices. From major building collapses in Bangladesh to companies dumping enough toxins to transform nearby water sources into a rainbow of chemicals, this year was full of the worst of what the fashion industry had to offer. Vote for the most deplorable here.

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Categories: Building Green

5 Tips to Make Your Home Safe, Green & Healthy from Zem Joaquin

Inhabitat - Sun, 12/29/2013 - 07:00

5 Tips to Green Your Home With Zem Joaquin, green home, green design, eco design, ecofabulous, eco-fabulous, sustainable design, green design, green interior design, green interiors

You’ve all heard the tired mantras about changing your lightbulbs and recycling at home in order to save the planet – are you yawning yet? Many consumers think that going green is a gesture of self-sacrifice that often comes at great expense and inconvenience – but nothing could be further from the truth. What many don’t realize is that going green is not really about doing something good “for the planet” but is instead about improving your own quality of life through making your environment safer and healthier. And one of the easiest places to start leading a greener and healthier life is in the home.

No one better epitomizes smart, healthy and stylish green living than Ecofabulous founder and cradle-to-cradle green designer Zem Joaquin. This eco jetsetter and green girl about town is well known for her phenomenal green parties, her insightful analysis of green products over on her site Ecofabulous, and her ability to make eco-friendly lifestyle choices feel glamorous and fun. We recently sat down with Zem to find out more about her gorgeous green home in the beautiful hills of Marin County, CA, and get her personal tips and tricks on how to make your home cleaner, greener and healthier through the power of smart design. Read on to find out about Zem’s secret tips for a green home, including – believe it or not – foot pedals on sinks!


Read the rest of 5 Tips to Make Your Home Safe, Green & Healthy from Zem Joaquin

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Categories: Building Green

misha #1 – #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

+mood - Sun, 12/29/2013 - 06:57

Earlier this month, we’ve featured shorelines (BTseries no.5) by Taeg Nishimoto. BTseries is an exploration of fabric’s behavior in lighting. “misha” is a table lamp and has four variations (#1 – #4.) It uses the white fabric made of 100% post-consumer plastic bottles. The fabric is hardened to structure itself while it is configured to make specific creases for light and shadow effects as the lamp shade. Fabric is cut into square and dipped into fabric hardener, then hung in a framed structure from four corners of the fabric. This hung fabric is pulled upwards from certain points by thread with spherical weight placed in between the pulled points so the fabric will create specific creases. This crease effect follows the way how the fabric behaves itself in relationship to the pulled points and different amount of weights. The hung fabric is left to dry until it is completely hardened. The resulting creased fabric is then placed upside down to create a lamp shade, which is placed above the black plastic tube that contains the light bulb inside. The fabric is held in place by two sets of metal wire connected to the plastic tube. When the light is not turned on, it presents a draped volume flowing above the table. When it’s lit, the lamp shade creates light and shadow effects lit through the creased fabric.

Read more about another project by Taeg Nishimotoshorelines (BTseries no.5) in our earlier story.

misha 1 4 640x214 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 1A 640x331 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 2A 640x203 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 2B 640x248 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 2C 640x231 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 3A 640x266 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 3B 640x261 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 3C 640x230 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 4A 640x334 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 4B 640x297 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

misha 4C 640x323 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto

courtesy Taeg Nishimoto

+ All images courtesy courtesy Taeg Nishimoto misha 1 180x180 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto misha 2 180x180 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto misha 3 180x180 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto misha 4 180x180 misha #1   #4 (BTseries no.2) by Taeg Nishimoto
Categories: Design Feeds

Why your next home may look more like an egg

CNBC - Sun, 12/29/2013 - 04:00
Some homeowners are finding a simple way to minimize the vulnerability of intense storms: building a dome home.

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by Dr. Radut